Servicing Guide

Published September 9, 2020

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How is the "Number of times the borrower has been exactly 30 days delinquent within the last six months" field calculated in the SMDU UI?

This data element indicates the number of times the loan was 30 days delinquent within the previous six months.

When a loan is less than sixty days delinquent and a servicer does not provide the "Number of times the borrower has been exactly 30 days delinquent within the last six months" (a required data field for IDE) in the SMDU Request, SMDU will derive that number. If a servicer does provide the number in the SMDU Request, SMDU will use the servicer-provided number in the IDE evaluation. The number used by SMDU for the IDE will be returned in the SMDU Response.

Review the four different scenarios to help aid you in completing this data element. 

Example 1:

In this example, at the beginning of January the loan has a due date of 01/01/2018. This makes the loan current, zero month’s delinquent, and is not considered 30 days delinquent in January. At the beginning of February, the borrower had not made their January payment. As a result, this makes the loan one-month delinquent, which is considered 30 days delinquent. At the beginning of March, the borrower had not made their January payment. As a result, the loan due date remains 01/01/2018. This makes the loan two months delinquent, which is considered 60 days delinquent. No payments were made in April, May or June; therefore, the loan due date remains 010/1/2018. The loan in April is three months delinquent (90 days delinquent); in May is four months delinquent (120 days), and in June is five months delinquent (150 days). None of those months qualify as a 30-day delinquency. Therefore, for the six-month period from 01/01/2018 to 06/01/2018, the borrower is considered to have experienced one 30-day delinquency and the “Number of times the borrower has been exactly 30 days delinquent within the last six months” should be populated with a value of one. 

Example 2:

In this example, at the beginning of January the loan has a due date of 01/01/2018. This makes the loan current, zero month’s delinquent, and is not considered 30 days delinquent in January. At the beginning of February, the borrower had not made their January payment. As a result, this makes the loan one-month delinquent, which is considered 30 days delinquent. At the beginning of March, the borrower had not made their January payment. As a result, the loan due date remains 01/01/2018. This makes the loan two months delinquent, which is considered 60 days delinquent. A payment was made in March, which advanced the due date to 02/01/2018 at the beginning of April. However, since the loan is still two months delinquent, this is still considered to be 60 days delinquent. In May the loan is current and remains current in June. Therefore, for the six-month period from 01/01/2018 to 06/01/2018, the borrower is considered to have experienced one 30 day delinquency and the “Number of times the borrower has been exactly 30 days delinquent within the last six months” should be populated with a value of one.

Example 3:

In this example, at the beginning of January the loan has a due date of 01/01/2018. This makes the loan current, zero month’s delinquent, and is not considered 30 days delinquent in January. At the beginning of February, the borrower had not made their January payment. As a result, this makes the loan one-month delinquent, which is considered 30 days delinquent. At the beginning of March, the loan still has a due date of 0101/2018. This makes the loan two months delinquent, which is considered 60 days delinquent.  A payment was made in March, which advances the due date to 02/01/2018 at the beginning of April. However, since the loan is still two months delinquent, this is still considered to be 60 days delinquent. In April the loan is brought current and is now due for the May payment. No payments are received in May and at the beginning of June the loan has a due date of 05/01/2018, making the loan one-month delinquent, which is considered to be 30 days delinquent. Therefore, for the six-month period from 01/01/2018 to 06/01/2018, the borrower is considered to have experienced two 30 day delinquencies and the “Number of times the borrower has been exactly 30 days delinquent within the last six months” should be populated with a value of two.

Example 4:

In this example, at the beginning of January the loan has a due date of 11/01/2017. This makes the loan two months delinquent, which is considered 60 days delinquent. In January, one payment has been received, which advanced the due date to 12/01/2017. However, since the loan is still two months delinquent, this is still considered to be 60 days delinquent. In February the payments are brought current and remain current through June. Therefore, for the six-month period from 01/01/2018 to 06/01/2018, the borrower is considered to have experienced no 30-day delinquencies and the “Number of times the borrower has been exactly 30 days delinquent within the last six months” should be populated with a value of zero.

For more information and examples please refer to the 'Evaluate for Imminent Default Using Fannie Mae’s Stand-Alone Tool' section of the SMDU UI User Guide.

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